Vacation Leave          Holidays           Bereavement
 
Voting Leave          Jury Duty          Sick Leave          Parental Leave

Disclaimer: The information contained herein is intended for general informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or an opinion on any issue.  Users are advised to seek legal advice from their legal counsel prior to taking (or omitting to take) any action based on the information contained herein.  While we periodically review and update the information contained herein, we do not warrant or guarantee the quality, accuracy or completeness of any information contained herein and the information should not be relied upon as accurate, timely or fit for any particular purpose. This information was constructed on October 15th 2018.

Are Employees entitled to time off [eg. Vacations, sick leave or holidays] in the United States as per Federal Legislation?

Under Section 207(3)(e) of the FLSA, regular rate has been defined not to include payments made for occasional periods when no work is performed due to vacation, holiday, illness, failure of the employer to provide sufficient work or other similar cause, reasonable payments for travelling expenses or other expenses incurred by an employee in the furtherance of his employer’s interests and properly reimbursable by the employer.

In other words, the FLSA does not require payment for time not worked, such as vacations, sick leave or holidays. These benefits are usually a matter of agreement between an Employer and an Employee.

The FMLA is designed to provide employees with temporary job security when faced with certain health-related care responsibilities that preclude them from working. However, it does not provide paid leave.

The FMLA compels employers who employ 50 or more employees to grant qualifying employees up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for:

  • Birth and care of the Employee’s child, or placement for adoption or foster care of a child with the Employee;
  • Birth and care of the Employee’s child, or placement for adoption or foster care of a child with the employee;
  • Care of an immediate family member (spouse, child, parent) who has a serious health condition; or
  • care of the employee’s own serious health condition.

An Employee will be eligible for FMLA if they have:

  1. Worked at least 12 months (which do not have to be consecutive) for the Employer
  2. Have worked at least 1,250 hours during the 12 months immediately before the FLMA leave date begins.

Further, if the Employee is a family member (spouse, son, daughter, parent or next of kin) of the Armed Forces, the Employer will provide up to 26 weeks unpaid leave to care for a member of the Armed Forces who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation or therapy. This also extends to members of the National Guard or Reserves.

Are Employees entitled to time off for jury duty in the following states?

Alabama

Alabama requires employers to grant paid leave to employees who are summoned for and participate in jury duty.

For the employee to be eligible for leave related to jury duty, the employee must show his or her employer the jury summons on the next day he or she is at work after receiving the summons. The employer must grant paid leave to the employee for the time required by the summons or required by any subsequent jury duty.

An employer cannot require or request an employee use annual, vacation, unpaid or sick leave for time spent complying with the jury summons or serving on a jury.

A court must automatically postpone or reschedule the jury duty of a summoned juror who is an employee of an employer with five or fewer full-time employees if another employee of the employer has been summoned to appear during the same period.
[Alabama Stat. 12-16-8]

An employer may not discharge or take any other adverse employment action against an employee who is serving on a jury, so long as the employee returns to work on the next regular workday after being dismissed from jury duty.
[Alabama Stat. 12-16-8.1]

Alaska

Alaska leave laws do not require employers to pay employees any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, threaten, coerce, or penalize an employee for complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury. [Alaska Stat. 9.20.037]

Arizona

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge or otherwise penalize an employee for complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not require an employee to use annual, vacation, or sick leave for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

When an employee returns from jury service, he or she must be returned to their previous position or to a higher position if the employee would have been entitled to the higher position had they not served jury duty. An employee cannot lose seniority while serving as a juror. [Arizona Stat. 21-236]

Arkansas

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge or otherwise penalize an employee for complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not require an employee to use annual, vacation, or sick leave for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

[Arkansas Stat. 16-31-106]

California

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge or otherwise penalize an employee for taking time off to serve as on a jury or trial jury, if the employee, prior to taking the time off, gives reasonable notice to the employer if he or she is required to serve.

An employee may use vacation, personal or compensatory leave, if available, for time taken responding to a jury summons or serving of a jury.

[California Labor Code 230]

Colorado

An employer must pay an employee up to $50 per day for the first three (3) days of juror service unless the employer and employee have agreed otherwise. [Colorado Stat. 13-71-126]

An employer may not discharge, penalize, harass, threaten, or coerce an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury. [Colorado Stat. 13-71-134]

Connecticut

An employer must pay full-time employees regular wages for the first five days, or part thereof, of jury service unless the employer has been excused by the Chief Court Administrator from compensating the employee. To be excused from compensating a juror, an employer must submit a written application to the Chief Court Administrator. The Chief Administrator must find the employer is subject to financial hardship sufficient to justify excusing them from the compensation obligation. In cases where an employer is excused for compensating an employee for jury service, the state will compensate the employee for the first five days of jury service, not to exceed $50 per day.

An employee is not considered a full-time employed juror on any day of jury service in which the person (1) would not have accrued regular wages if they were not serving as a juror on that day, or (2) would not have worked more than one-half of a shift which extends into another day if they were not serving as a juror on that day. Each juror not considered a full-time employed juror on a particular day is reimbursed by the state of Connecticut for necessary out-of-pocket expenses incurred during that day of jury service, provided the day of service falls within the first five days, or part thereof, of jury service. 

[Connecticut Stat. 51-247a]

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee for receiving or responding to a jury summons or for serving on a jury.

Any employee who has served eight hours of jury duty in any one day is deemed to have worked a legal day’s work and an employer cannot require the employee to work in excess of eight hours as dictated by [Connecticut Stat. 31-21]; [Connecticut Stat. 51-247a]

Delaware

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or for serving on a jury. An employer may not consider as wages the fee paid by the state to an employee for jury service. [Delaware Code 10-4514]

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee because the employee receives or responds to a summons or serves as a juror. [Delaware Code 10-4515]

District of Columbia

District Columbia law requires employers to provide employees with leave to respond to a jury summons and serve on a jury. No provision of the law requires that the jury duty leave is paid. The law also prohibits an employer from terminating, disciplining, threatening, or otherwise coercing an employee because the employee receives or responds to a summons or serves on a jury.

An employer who terminates, disciplines, threatens or otherwise coerces an employee because he/she receives or responds to a summons or serves on a jury is guilty of criminal contempt and may be fined up to $300 and imprisoned for up to 30 days, for the first offense. For subsequent offenses, the employer may be fined up to $5,000 and imprisoned for up to 180 days.

An employee who is terminated in violation of the jury duty leave law may, within nine (9) months of the offense, file a claim in civil court against his/her employer to recover lost wages. If the employee succeeds in his/her claim, the employer will be required to pay the reasonable attorney fees of the employee.

[D.C. Code 11-1913]

Florida

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee because the employee receives or responds to a summons or serves as a juror. [Florida Stat. 40.271.]

An employer is not required, however, to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or for serving on a jury. [Florida Stat. 40.24]

Georgia

Georgia law makes it illegal for an employer to discharge, discipline, or otherwise penalize an employee for taking leave for the purposes of attending a judicial proceeding in response to a subpoena, summons for jury duty, or other court order. It is also illegal for an employer to threaten an employee with discharge, discipline, or any other adverse employment action for taking leave for the purposes of attending a judicial proceeding in response to a subpoena, summons for jury duty, or other court order. [GA Code 34-1-3.]

Georgia does not have any laws specifically requiring employers to provide paid leave for an employee to perform jury service. However, the Attorney General issued an opinion in 1989 interpreting GA Code 34-1-3 as requiring employers to pay employees for jury service leave. In 1998, the Attorney General issued another opinion in which it was stated that an employee would have a private right of action (they could file a civil claim in state court) against their employer for failure to pay wages for jury leave. Many counties have adopted the Attorney General’s position when providing direction to jurors, however, no court has addressed the viability of the Attorney General’s opinion.

Hawaii

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee who receives and/or responds to a jury summons or who serves on a jury. [Haw. Rev. Stat. 612-25]

Idaho

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee who receives and/or responds to a jury summons or who serves on a jury. [Idaho Stat. 2-218]

Illinois

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer must grant an employee time off to serve on a jury, regardless of the employment shift to which the employee is assigned. An employer may not require an employee to work a night shift while the employee is serving jury duty during the day.

An employer may not discharge, threaten to discharge, penalize, intimidate or coerce any employee who receives and/or responds to a jury summons or who serves on a jury. [Illinois Stat. 705 ILCS 305/4.1]

Indiana

Indiana does not require employers to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not subject an employee to an adverse employment action (e.g., termination, demotion, discipline) for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not subject an employee to an adverse employment action (e.g., termination, demotion, discipline) for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury if the employee provides notice to the employer of the jury service within a reasonable period either after receiving the summons or before the service is to begin.

If an employer with 10 or fewer employees has an employee summoned for jury service while another employee is already performing jury service, the employer may request, through either employer, that the summoned employee’s jury service be postponed until the employee currently performing jury service completes his or her service.

[Indiana Code 33-28-5-24.3]

Iowa

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury unless the employer has a policy or practice of doing so.

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee who receives and/or responds to a jury summons or who serves on a jury. Iowa Code 607A.45

Kansas

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee who receives and/or responds to a jury summons or who serves on a jury. Kansas Stat. 43-173

Kentucky

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee who receives and/or responds to a jury summons or who serves on a jury.

[Kentucky Stat. 29A.160]

Louisiana

Louisiana prohibits an employer from discharging or taking any other adverse employment action against an employee for being called to serve or serving jury duty, so long as the employee gives the employer reasonable notice of the jury obligation after receiving the summons. Employers who unlawfully discharge employees for serving jury duty may be subject to fines of not less than $100 and not more than $1,000, for each discharge and may be ordered to reinstate the employee with the same wage rate and benefits they enjoyed prior to the discharge. [Louisiana Stat. 23:965.]

When employees are called or subpoenaed to serve on a state petit or grand jury, or central jury pool, the employer is required to pay up to one (1) days wages and the employee cannot be required to take any vacation, sick, or other accrued personal leave while responding to the call or subpoena. Employers who unlawfully discharge employees for serving jury duty may be subject to fines of not less than $100 and not more than $1,000, for each discharge and may be ordered pay the employee one day’s wages without a reduction in vacation, sick, or other personal leave. [Louisiana Stat. 23:965.]

 

Maine

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, deny health insurance coverage to, or otherwise coerce an employee who receives and/or responds to a jury summons or who serves on a jury.

[Maine Stat. 14:1218]

Maryland

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee who receives and/or responds to a jury summons or who serves on a jury. [Maryland Courts and Judicial Proceedings Stat. 8-501]

Massachusetts

An employer must pay regular employees their regular wages for the first three (3) days, or part thereof, of juror service. Regular employees include part-time, temporary, and casual employees as long as the hours of the employee may reasonably be determined by a schedule or by custom and practice established during the three-month period preceding the term of juror service. Each self-employed juror is responsible for compensating himself for the first three (3) days, or part thereof, of juror service. [Massachusetts Stat. 234A.48]

A court has the authority to excuse an employer from the duty to compensate an employee on jury duty or to excuse a self-employed juror from the duty to compensate himself for the first three (3) days, or part thereof, of juror service upon a finding that the employer or self-employed juror would suffer extreme financial hardship if the duty to pay wages for the first three (3) days were not removed. If an employer or self-employed juror is excused from paying wages, the court must award reasonable compensation in lieu of wages to the juror to be paid by the state for the first three (3) days, or part thereof, of juror service, up to $50 per day. [Massachusetts Stat. 234A.49]

An employer may not discharge, penalize, deny benefits to, harass, threaten, or coerce an employee because the employee has received and/or responds to a juror summons or performs any obligation related of juror service. An employer may not impose compulsory work assignments upon any employee or do any other intentional act which substantially interferes with the availability, effectiveness, attentiveness, or peace of mind of the employee during the performance of his or her juror service. [Massachusetts Stat. 234A.61]

Michigan

An employer is not required to pay an employee for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, discipline, or threaten an employee for being summoned for jury duty, serving on a jury, or having served on a jury.

An employer may not require an employee who serves jury duty, without the employees’ voluntary consent or pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement, to work:

  • any number of hours during a day which, if added to the number of hours which the employee spends on jury duty, exceeds the number of hours normally worked by the employee during a day, or
  • the number of hours normally worked by the employee if it would result in the employee be required to work past the employee’s normal quitting time.

[Michigan Stat. 600.1348]

Minnesota

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, threaten, coerce, or penalize an employee for complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

[Minnesota Stat. 593.50]

Mississippi

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not persuade or attempt to persuade any employee to avoid jury service or discharge, intimidate, threaten or otherwise subject an employee to an adverse employment action as a result of jury service if the employee notifies the employer he or she has been summoned to serve as a juror within a reasonable period of time after receiving a summons.

An employer may not require or request an employee to use annual, vacation, or sick leave for time spent responding to a summons for jury duty, time spent participating in the jury selection process, or time spent actually serving on a jury. [Mississippi Stat. 13-5-35]

Missouri

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not terminate, discipline, threaten or take any adverse action against an employee on account of that employee’s receipt of and/or response to a jury summons or for serving on a jury.

An employer may not require or request an employee to use annual, vacation, or sick leave for time spent responding to a summons for jury duty, time spent participating in the jury selection process, or time spent actually serving on a jury.

[Missouri Stat. 494.460]

Montana

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer shall not terminate or take any adverse action against an employee on account of that employee’s receipt of and/or response to a jury summons or for serving on a jury. [Montana Stat. 39-2-904]

Nebraska

An employer must pay an employee for time the employee is excused from shift work while serving on a jury, except an employer may reduce the pay of an employee by an amount equal to any compensation, other than expenses, paid the employee by the court for jury duty.

An employer may not subject an employee to discharge from employment, loss of pay, loss of sick leave, loss of vacation time, or any other form of penalty, as a result of his or her absence from employment due to jury duty, so long as the employee has provided reasonable notice to his or her employer of the jury summons.

[Nebraska Stat. 25-1640]

Nevada

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge an employee or threaten an employee with discharge for responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not require an employee responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury to:

  • use sick leave or vacation time; or
  • work:

within eight (8) hours before the time at which he is to appear for jury duty; or

between 5:00 p.m. on the day of his appearance for jury duty and 3:00 a.m. the following day, if his service has lasted for four (4) hours or more on the day of his appearance for jury duty, including his time going to and returning from the place where the court is held.

Nevada Stat. 6.190

New Hampshire

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, threaten, or coerce an employee for receiving and/or responding to a summons, serves as a juror, or attends court for prospective jury service.

[New Hampshire Stat. 500-A:14]

New Jersey

An employer is not required to pay an employee any wages for time spent complying with a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee with respect to employment because the employee is required to attend court for jury service. [New Jersey Stat. 2B:20-17]

New Mexico

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee because the employee receives a summons for jury service, responds to the summons, serves as a juror, or attends court for prospective jury service.

An employer may not require or request an employee to use annual, vacation or sick leave for time spent responding to a summons for jury service, participating in the jury selection process, or serving on a jury.

[New Mexico Stat. 38-5-18]

New York

An employer who employs more than (10) employees must pay an employee the first $40 of the employee’s regular daily wages for the first three (3) days of jury service. In all other instances, an employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge or penalize an employee who is summoned to serve as a juror and who notifies the employer to that effect prior to the commencement of a term of service.

[New York Judiciary Code 519]

North Carolina

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

No employer may discharge or demote any employee because the employee has been called for jury duty or is serving as a juror.

[North Carolina Stat. 9-32]

North Dakota

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, lay off, penalize, threaten, or otherwise coerce an employee, because the employee receives and/or responds to a summons, serves as a juror, or attends court for jury service.

[North Dakota Stat. 27-9.1-17]

Ohio

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, threaten to discharge, or take any disciplinary action that could lead to the discharge of any permanent employee who is summoned to serve as a juror if the employee gives reasonable notice to the employer of the summons prior to the commencement of the employee’s service as a juror and if the employee is absent from employment because of the actual jury service.

An employer may not require or request an employee to use annual, vacation, or sick leave for time spent responding to a summons for jury duty, time spent participating in the jury selection process, or for time spent actually serving on a jury.

[Ohio Rev. Code 2313.18]

Oklahoma

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge or otherwise subject to any adverse employment action an employee who is summoned to serve as a juror and who notifies his or her employer of the summons within a reasonable period of time after receiving the summons and prior to his or her appearance for jury duty.

An employer may not require or request an employee to use annual, vacation, or sick leave for time spent responding to a summons for jury duty, time spent participating in the jury selection process, or time spent actually serving on a jury.

[Oklahoma Stat. 38-34]

Oregon

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury. [Oregon Stat. 10.061]

An employer may not discharge, threaten to discharge, intimidate, or coerce any employee by reason of the employee’s service or scheduled service as a juror. [Oregon Stat. 10.090]

Pennsylvania

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not deprive an employee of his or her seniority position or benefits, or discharge, threaten, or otherwise coerce him or her, because the employee receives and/or responds to a summons, serves as a juror, or attends court for prospective jury service. This prohibition does not apply to employers in the retail or service industries with fewer than 15 employees or to employers in the manufacturing industry with fewer than 40 employees. However, employees working for employers in these industries who are exempt from the law due to their limited number of employees may be excused from jury service upon request to the court.

[Pennsylvania Stat. 42:4563]

Rhode Island

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, or deny wage increases, promotions, longevity benefits, or any other benefit due to the employee because the employee has been called to serve jury duty.

[Rhode Island Stat. 9-9-28]

South Carolina

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge or demote an employee who complies with a jury summons or serves on a jury.

[South Carolina Stat. 41-1-70]

South Dakota

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

Any employee serving as a juror must retain and be entitled to the same job status, pay, and seniority as he or she had prior to performing jury duty.

[South Dakota Stat. 16-13-41.2]

An employer may not discharge or suspend any employee from his employment for serving as a juror in any court in the State of South Dakota.

[South Dakota Stat. 16-13-41.1]

Tennessee

An employer who employs five (5) or more employees must pay employees for time spent serving jury duty, except employees who are employed on a temporary basis of less than six (6) months. An employer may deduct from the wages any fees received by the employee for serving on the jury.

An employer must grant an employee an excused absence for jury service if the employee shows the jury summons to the employer on the next workday after receiving the summons, so long as the employee’s jury service last more than three (3) hours on the days of service. An employer may not discharge or in any manner discriminate against an employee for serving jury duty if such employee, prior to taking time off, gives the required notice.

If an employee summoned for jury duty is working a night shift or is working during hours preceding those in which court is normally held, the employee must be excused from work for the shift immediately preceding the employee’s first day of service. After the first day of service, when the employee’s responsibility for jury duty exceeds three (3) hours during a day, the employee must be excused from the employee’s next scheduled work period occurring within twenty-four (24) hours of the day of jury service.

[Tennessee Stat. 22-4-106]

Texas

An employer may not discharge a permanent employee because the employee serves as a juror. However, an employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury. 

[Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code 122.001]

 

Utah

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, threaten, take any adverse employment action, or otherwise coerce an employee because the employee receives and/or responds to a summons, serves as a juror, or attends court for the prospective jury.

An employer may not require or request an employee to use annual, vacation, or sick leave for time spent responding to a summons for jury duty, time spent participating in the jury selection process, or for time spent actually serving on a jury.

[Utah Stat. 78B-1-116]

Vermont

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge an employee by reason of his service as a juror, or penalize such employee or deprive him of any right, privilege, or benefit on a basis which discriminates between such employee and other employees not serving as jurors. All employees shall be considered in the service of their employer during all times while serving as jurors in accordance with this section for purposes of determining seniority, fringe benefits, credit toward vacations and other rights, privileges, and benefits of employment.

[Vermont Stat. 21-5-499]

Virginia

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge or take any other adverse action against an employee for receiving and/or responding to a jury summons or for serving on a jury if the employee has given reasonable notice of the summons or jury service.

An employer may not require an employee to take a vacation or sick leave when responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury if the employee has given reasonable notice of the summons or jury service.

An employer may not require an employee who is summoned and appears for jury duty for four (4) or more hours in one day, including travel time, to start any work shift that begins on or after 5:00 p.m. on the day of his appearance for jury duty or begins before 3:00 a.m. on the day following the day of his appearance for jury duty.

[Virginia Stat. 18.2-465.1]

Washington

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer must provide an employee with sufficient leave of absence from work to serve as a juror.

An employer may not discharge, threaten, coerce, or harass an employee, or deny an employee promotional opportunity because the employee receives and/or responds to a summons, serves as a juror, or attends court for prospective jury service.

[Washington Stat. 2.36.165]Washington Juror FAQ

West Virginia

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer must excuse an employee from work for the day or days required in serving as a juror if the employee shows his or her jury summons to the employer, including his or her immediate supervisor, on the next workday after receiving the summons.

[West Virginia Stat. 52-1-21]

Wisconsin

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer must grant an employee a leave of absence without loss of time in service for the period of jury service. For the purpose of determining seniority or pay advancement, the status of the employee cannot be considered uninterrupted by the jury service.

An employer may not discharge or take any other adverse employment action against an employee due to the employee’s service as a juror.

[Wisconsin Stat. 756.255]

Wyoming

An employer is not required to pay an employee for time spent responding to a jury summons or serving on a jury.

An employer may not discharge, threaten to discharge, intimidate or coerce any employee by reason of the employee’s attendance or scheduled attendance in connection with jury service.

[Wyoming Stat. 1-11-401]